SIGUR ROS: A BRILLIANT ART & MUSIC EXPLOSION

Sigur Ros

Story By: Leila Adell

Photos by: Marshall Foster

AUSTIN, TX(June 10, 2017)- Sigur Ros, which translates directly to “victory rose,” delivered a ground-shaking performance surrounded by a one-of-a-kind set at Austin’s Moody Theater. Huanting Icelandic syllables echoed around the theater from the start, as Sigur Ros performed without a supporting act. Instead, they performed both sold-out shows in two immersive sets with songs spanning their 23-year career.

The Sigur Ros trio brought an enormous amount of energy to their performance. Though songs typically started as melodic, contemplative pieces, they would evolve until reaching crescendos so intense it seemed the stage might split apart and melt away.

The artistic visuals were a force to be reckoned with all on their own, though they were consistently in perfect synch with the music.  The melding of art and music heightened  the senses and enveloped us into the experience. Their award-winning team of illumination engineers filled the stage with LED screens, 3-D effects, lasers and absorbing abstract videos.  The red and turquoise celestial and geometric shapes surrounding the band helped convey the yearning yet hopeful message of the Icelandic lyrics.

Lyrics were dispersed with what fans affectionately refer to as “Hopelandic,” a non-literal language created by their frontman Jonsi. “Vonlenska,” as Jonsi calls it, is constructed from sounds of different languages to compliment instrumental sounds, a sort of Icelandic scat singing. The audience can immerse themselves in the sound without worrying too much about the lyrics.

The band will go on to tour the east coast before leaving the country in late July. Catch them for an unforgettable audiovisual experience.

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Marshall Foster
PHOTOGRAPHER at MIXED MARSHALL ARTS
Marshall is an US-based humanitarian and travel photographer who collaborates with NGOs to tell their stories and to train their field staff to do the same.

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